Take-home & notes

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2018-02-25 12:05:57
#All pieces are gathered from critics and reviews. Reference listed at the end of the contents.
*All broken sentences are my personal interpretation and respond notes to the comments or the film.

#A film about "man's relationship to the universe".
Intending to set the film apart from the "monsters and sex" type of science fiction films of the time, Kubrick used Homer's The Odyssey as inspiration for the title. Kubrick said, "it occurred to us that for the Greeks the vast stretches of the sea must have had the same sort of mystery and remoteness that space has for our generation.

#"Kubrick scholar Michel Ciment, discussing Kubrick's attitude toward human aggression and instinct, observes: "The bone cast into the air by the ape (now become a man) is transformed at the other extreme of civilization, by one of those abrupt ellipses characteristic of the director, into a spacecraft on its way to the moon." In contrast to Ciment's





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#All pieces are gathered from critics and reviews. Reference listed at the end of the contents.
*All broken sentences are my personal interpretation and respond notes to the comments or the film.

#A film about "man's relationship to the universe".
Intending to set the film apart from the "monsters and sex" type of science fiction films of the time, Kubrick used Homer's The Odyssey as inspiration for the title. Kubrick said, "it occurred to us that for the Greeks the vast stretches of the sea must have had the same sort of mystery and remoteness that space has for our generation.

#"Kubrick scholar Michel Ciment, discussing Kubrick's attitude toward human aggression and instinct, observes: "The bone cast into the air by the ape (now become a man) is transformed at the other extreme of civilization, by one of those abrupt ellipses characteristic of the director, into a spacecraft on its way to the moon." In contrast to Ciment's reading of a cut to a serene "other extreme of civilization", science fiction novelist Robert Sawyer, speaking in the Canadian documentary 2001 and Beyond, saw it as a cut from a bone to a nuclear weapons platform, explaining that "what we see is not how far we've leaped ahead, what we see is that today, '2001', and four million years ago on the African veldt, it's exactly the same—the power of mankind is the power of its weapons. It's a continuation, not a discontinuity in that jump."

#In a 1968 interview with Playboy magazine, Kubrick stated:
You're free to speculate as you wish about the philosophical and allegorical meaning of the film—and such speculation is one indication that it has succeeded in gripping the audience at a deep level—but I don't want to spell out a verbal road map for 2001 that every viewer will feel obligated to pursue or else fear he's missed the point.

#For some readers, Arthur C. Clarke's more straightforward novel based on the script is key to interpreting the film. Clarke's novel explicitly identifies the monolith as a tool created by an alien race that has been through many stages of evolution, moving from organic form to biomechanical, and finally achieving a state of pure energy. These aliens travel the cosmos assisting lesser species to take evolutionary steps.

*Only through blind himself the same way as the viewers be blinded, could Kubrick make this movie the particular kind of allegorical that allows endless individualized interpretations. There is no ambiguity because the reading is not set to be definite. The point of this movie is to experience and to focus on the process of solving a puzzle, which at the end of the movie everyone realize that there is no The Puzzle, thus there is no any conclusion.

*What time bringing to 2001 has drawn a vague line between science fiction and artistic film. There is no need to argue whether the infant comes to revive humanity or to destroy it. We see how across half century the film critics transformed from bestowing multiple design and visual effect awards on the film to enlist it into the most influential film in the 20's century. Many more borrowed wisely from it, but none achieved the same level of artistic vibrants in a deeper level. Kubrick is the one keep telling us how powerful a mere representation is. A great story is a great story, and only a great story. But we have to see sometimes the blank space left in a detailed story results in more thoughts, triggers more feelings, and lasts longer in our perception and imagination towards the possibility of our reality.

#Spielberg calls it his film generation's "big bang", while Lucas says it was "hugely inspirational", labeling Kubrick as "the filmmaker's filmmaker". Sydney Pollack refers to it as "groundbreaking", and William Friedkin states 2001 is "the grandfather of all such films".

#Others credit 2001 with opening up a market for films such as Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Alien, Blade Runner and Contact; proving that big-budget "serious" science-fiction films can be commercially successful, and establishing the "sci-fi blockbuster" as a Hollywood staple.

#In 2012 Lockheed engineer Adam Johnson, working with Frederick I. Ordway III, science adviser to Kubrick, wrote the book 2001: The Lost Science, which for the first time featured many of the blueprints of the spacecraft and film sets that previously had been thought destroyed. Clarke wrote three sequel novels: 2010: Odyssey Two (1982), 2061: Odyssey Three (1987), and 3001: The Final Odyssey (1997). The only filmed sequel, 2010, was based on Clarke's 1982 novel and was released in 1984.

#What Kubrick is saying, in the final sequence, apparently, is that man will eventually outgrow his machines, or be drawn beyond them by some cosmic awareness. He will then become a child again, but a child of an infinitely more advanced, more ancient race, just as apes once became, to their own dismay, the infant stage of man.
And the monoliths? Just road markers, I suppose, each one pointing to a destination so awesome that the traveler cannot imagine it without being transfigured. Or as cummings wrote on another occasion, "listen -- there's a hell of a good universe next door; let's go."

*Roger Ebert's review is probably the best one that is so close to the director's initial care of human being's development. Here is his bio link just in case anyone is interested in reading him further. https://www.rogerebert.com/contributors/roger-ebert


TBC

Reference:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2001:_A_Space_Odyssey_(film)
https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/2001-a-space-odyssey-1968
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/1000085_2001_a_space_odyssey?
http://www.metacritic.com/movie/2001-a-space-odyssey
https://www.wired.com/2015/08/amazingly-accurate-futurism-2001-space-odyssey/
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