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屌丝生存现状面面观

xinbabay 2014-11-15
An investigation into the living conditions of China’s “diaosi” population was one of the most read reports of the last week with more than 8 million views on the day of publication.

The term, literally meaning “penis hair,” was first coined in October 2010 and has become a synonym for “loser.”

According to the report, Jilin was the Province of the Year for diaosi, with residents polled showing the highest “Diaosi Index.” Changchun was similarly named the Diaosi City of the Year.

Nearly 74 percent of diaosi stay far away from their homes and live a frugal life. In 2014, their average monthly income hovered at 2,918 yuan. Diaosi in Beijing earned an average 5,793 yuan.

Work occupies most of their time, with 22 percent of diaosi working overtime every day. Unwilling to spend on recreation, 54 percent of those polled said they spent only 500 yuan on travel each year. Social networking and online games were their top hobbies.

Jointly produced by the Peking University Marketing and Media Center and Ganji.com, a j...
An investigation into the living conditions of China’s “diaosi” population was one of the most read reports of the last week with more than 8 million views on the day of publication.

The term, literally meaning “penis hair,” was first coined in October 2010 and has become a synonym for “loser.”

According to the report, Jilin was the Province of the Year for diaosi, with residents polled showing the highest “Diaosi Index.” Changchun was similarly named the Diaosi City of the Year.

Nearly 74 percent of diaosi stay far away from their homes and live a frugal life. In 2014, their average monthly income hovered at 2,918 yuan. Diaosi in Beijing earned an average 5,793 yuan.

Work occupies most of their time, with 22 percent of diaosi working overtime every day. Unwilling to spend on recreation, 54 percent of those polled said they spent only 500 yuan on travel each year. Social networking and online games were their top hobbies.

Jointly produced by the Peking University Marketing and Media Center and Ganji.com, a job portal, the survey makes use of data collected from Ganji.com users.

“We collected 210,000 online questionnaires for the report from participants in 50 cities,” a Ganji.com employee said.

“The report really hit home with me!” said Liu Rong. Liu is an office worker who often refers to herself as a “female diaosi.”

“The city is rife with young people who look glamorous from the outside but who taste extreme bitterness when they are alone,” she said.

“It’s worth paying attention to the way more and more young people are inclined to label themselves as diaosi,” said Li Xia, a researcher at Peking University.

While some show sympathy toward diaosi, others condemn them as lazy youths who are unwilling to take control of their lives.

“Labeling yourself a diaosi is just way to blame other people for your situation. If you really want things to change, you have to fight,” said Deng Xiquan, deputy director of Youth Studies at the China Youth and Children Research Center.
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